Food News


So this seems like a very New York-centric thing to worry about, and being in NYC, I am just as worried with this whole thing.Apparently the mercury levels in Tuna (specifically Bluefin, but other species as well) are a lot higher than the EPA and FDA had previously thought, after testing sushi from 20 Manhattan restaurants and stores. The more expensive the sushi, the higher the mercury levels (mainly because better quality sushi comes from larger fish). The NY Dept of Health and Mental Hygiene found that the levels of mercury in New Yorkers’ blood is three times that of the national average. The demographic that tended to have the highest amounts of mercury were Asian New Yorkers, especially foreign born Chinese. (Not especially good news for me.)

Here is the article: High Mercury Levels Are Found in Tuna Sushi

It was followed up by an article the next day: Warnings Don’t Deter Lovers of Sushi

As well as an editorial: Tuna Troubles

Oh New York. You gotta love it.

Now here’s an article I think just about anyone can find interesting. Yes, it’s the little known history of the fortune cookie.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/16/dining/16fort.html?pagewanted=3&_r=1

Among the interesting research is the discovery that fortune cookies are most likely a Japanese treat. The article suggests that they could have been popularized in America as a Chinese treat when many Japanese in the 1920s and 30s opened Chop Suey restaurants (largely Americanized Chinese dishes). Read on brother, it’s some really cool stuff.

Fujiya

More food news. This is a story about Japan’s candy manufacturers, Akafuku, Shiroi Koibito and Fujiya. Fujiya still has an adorable logo.

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/10/31/world/asia/31japan.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

For the foodies out there, Lobsters are hurtin’ as a mysterious bacterial disease is eating away at their shells. This is largely affecting lobsters in the NorthEast, so maybe the trip to Maine will have to wait.

Disturbingly enough, these lobsters are still servable. The disease affects the shell, but supposedly the meat is still safe to eat.

Some researchers are saying that this bacteria may be a chemical byproduct of industrial sources.

Once so delicious. Now so sad. And so so gross.

http://www.bostonnow.com/lobster
http://seagrant.gso.uri.edu/factsheets/lobster_shell_disease.html